Tag: #errors

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Posted in Aviation Conformist Human Factor Social animal

A question of Safety or Ethics, how Boeing & Alcoa handled differently.

Two accidents where supposedly Boeing did not inform the pilots about important technical information affecting safety. Is it a Safety or Ethical issue.

 
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Posted in #safety #training Aviation Conformist Human Factor Social animal

Non-functional SMS,some accidents are just inevitable

All systems are composed of three basic elements: people; processes; and technology. While managing safety, all three elements have to work cohesively in order to produce the desired results. The cost of workplace injuries is staggering: employers pay as much as $1 billion per week in direct and indirect workers’ compensations costs. Indirect costs include training replacement employees, accident investigation, lost productivity, etc., and can be 20 times higher than direct medical and wage replacement costs. The industries with the largest percentage of workers’ compensation claims include: air travel (7.3 percent get injured on the job), beverage and tobacco manufacturing (6.9…

 
2 Comments
Posted in #safety Aviation Human Factor

Pathological state of aviation safety. Learnings from recent SpiceJet incidents.

Establishing a safety culture in the organization is the most effective means of safety assurance in the long term. Humans play a vital role in the running of the processes and are also the cause of most errors. There are a number of reasons for both errors and violations. Instead of increasing controls in terms of engineering controls and SOP’s, it is beneficial for the organization to implement a generative safety culture, wherein safety becomes a way of life and there is little oversight or control required. Losses are prevented at every stage and hazards are actively identified and risk mitigated.

 
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Posted in #insrumentscan #pilot monitoring #safety #training Aviation Conformist Human Factor Social animal

Startle vs Surprise and flight crew training

Background Startle and surprise are often cited as potentially contributing factors to aircraft incidents due to their possible negative effects on flight crew performance. In the past, these terms have often been used interchangeably; however, there are distinctive conceptual, behavioural, and physiological differences between the startle reflex and the surprise emotion. The prevalence of startle and surprise on the flight deck has been investigated by examining voluntary incident reports in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). Surprise has been found to be more prevalent than startle.  

 
Go Air wrong engine shut down
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Posted in #pilot monitoring #safety #training Aviation Human Factor Social animal

GoAir passengers survived a wrong engine shutdown, where British Midland and TransAsia couldn’t

Errors in Aviation Decision making, bad decisions or bad luck!

 
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Posted in #insrumentscan #pilot monitoring #safety #training Aviation Conformist Fatigue Human Factor Social animal

100% of accidents have Human Factor: mindFly

Introduction Humans, by their very nature, make mistakes. Human error is implicated in 70% to 80% of aviation accidents. (O’Hare, Wiggins, Batt, & Morrison, 1994; Wiegmann and Shappell, 1999; Yacavone, 1993). My views I beg to differ with the basic premise. Human involvement in the chain of events leading to an accident is a fact. There is a 100% involvement of humans in the error chain. Elimination of error is not feasible. Human factors are about designing systems that are resilient to unanticipated events. Training Crew resource management is a training intervention for threat error management. The whole focus has…